Kumargram

Kumargram
Community development block
Jayanti Hills in the northern part of Kumargram CD block
Jayanti Hills in the northern part of Kumargram CD block
Kumargram is located in West Bengal
Kumargram
Kumargram
Location in West Bengal, India
Coordinates: 26°39′54″N 89°49′30″E / 26.665°N 89.825°E / 26.665; 89.825Coordinates: 26°39′54″N 89°49′30″E / 26.665°N 89.825°E / 26.665; 89.825
Country India
StateWest Bengal
DistrictAlipurduar
Area
 • Total517.68 km2 (199.88 sq mi)
Population
 (2011)
 • Total199,609
 • Density390/km2 (1,000/sq mi)
Languages
 • OfficialBengali, English
Time zoneUTC+5:30 (IST)
Lok Sabha constituencyAlipurduars
Vidhan Sabha constituencyKumargram
Websitewww.kumargramblock.com

Kumargram is a community development block (CD block) that forms an administrative division in the Alipurduar subdivision of the Alipurduar district in the Indian state of West Bengal.

Geography

Kumargram is located at 26°39′54″N 89°49′30″E / 26.665°N 89.825°E / 26.665; 89.825.

The Kumargarm CD Block lies in the eastern part of the district. The Sanaka River flows along the eastern boundary. It has hilly terrain which is part of the sub-Himalayan ranges.[1][2]

Kumargram CD block is bounded by the Chukha District in Bhutan on the north, Gossaigaon Revenue Circle/ Tehsil in Kokrajhar district in Assam on the east, Tufanganj II CD block in Cooch Behar district on the south, and Alipurduar II and Kalchini CD blocks on the west.[2][3][4]

The Kumargram CD block has an area of 517.68 km2. It has 1 panchayat samity, 11 gram panchayats, 144 gram sansads (village councils), 55 mouzas, 53 inhabited villages and 3 census towns. Kumargram police station serves this block.[5] Headquarters of this CD block is at Kumargram.[2]

Gram panchayats of Kumargram block/ panchayat samiti are: Chengmari, Kamakhyaguri I, Kamakhyaguri II, Khoardanga I, Khoardanga II, Kumargram, Newland, Kumargram Sankos, Rydak, Turturikhanda, Valka Barabisa I, Valka Barabisa II.[6]

Demographics

Population

According to the 2011 Census of India, the Kumargram CD block had a total population of 199,609, of which 174,058 were rural, and 25,551 were urban. There were 102,592 (51%) males and 97,017 (49%) females. There were 23,771 persons in the age range of 0 to 6 years. The Scheduled Castes numbered 71,417 (35.78%) and the Scheduled Tribes numbered 59,877 (30.00%).[7]

According to the 2001 census, Kumargram block had a total population of 177,894, out of which 91,421 were males and 86,473 were females. Kumargram block registered a population growth of 15.60 per cent during the 1991-2001 decade.[8]

Census towns in the Kumargram CD block are (2011 census figures in brackets): Laskarpara (7,137), Dakshin Rampur (6,932) and Uttar Kamakhyaguri (12,022).[7]

Large villages (with 4,000+ population) in the Kumargram CD block are (2011 census figures in brackets): Kartika Tea Garden (4,779), Jayanti Tea Garden (5,098), Raydak Tea Garden (7,610), Madhya Narathali (4,598), Paschim Narathali (4,665), Dakshin Narathali (7,433), Madhya Kamakhyaguri (4,759), Telipara (4,139), Narathali (6,337), Newlands Tea Garden (6,369), Kumargram Tea Garden (6,328), Sankos Tea Garden (6,643), Kumargram (5,384), Madhya Haldibari (4,252), Barabisa (4,433) and Purba Chakchaka (4,523).[7]

Other villages in the Kumargram CD block include (2011 census figures in brackets): Chengmari (1,658), Turtiuri Khanda (2,844) and Bhalka (3,946).[7]

Literacy

According to the 2011 census, the total number of literate persons in the Kumargram CD block was 127,335 (72.48% of the population over 6 years) out of which males numbered 71,202 (78.76% of the male population over 6 years) and females numbered 56,135 (65.71% of the female population over 6 years). The gender disparity (the difference between female and male literacy rates) was 13.05%.[7]

See also – List of West Bengal districts ranked by literacy rate

Literacy in CD Blocks of
Jalpaiguri district
Jalpaiguri Sadar subdivision
Rajganj – 62.82%
Jalpaiguri – 73.81%
Maynaguri – 75.63%
Dhupguri – 60.57%
Malbazar subdivision
Mal – 66.31
Matiali – 66.98%
Nagrakata – 61.27%
Alipurduar subdivision
Madarihat-Birpara – 67.77%
Kalchini – 68.96%
Kumargram – 72.42%
Alipurduar I – 78.19%
Alipurduar II – 75.76%
Falakata – 72.64%
Source:
2011 Census: CD Block Wise

Primary Census Abstract Data


Language and religion

According to the District Census Handbook, Jalpaiguri, 2011 census, as of 2001, Bengali was the mother-tongue 55.8% of the population of Jalpaiguri district, followed by Sadan/ Sadri (14.3%), Nepali/ Gorkhali (6.9%), Hindi (4.6%), Kurukh/ Oraon (2.6%), Santali (1.0%), Bodo/Boro (0.8%), Munda (0.7%), Bhojpuri (0.7%), Rajbanshi (0.5%), Telugu (0.4%), Urdu (0.3%), Rabha (0.3%), Odiya (0.3%), Kharia (0.1%) and other mother-tongues (10.8%). The proportion of the population speaking Bengali increased from 54.5% in 1961 to 68.5% in 1981 and thereafter dropped to 55.8% in 2001. During the same period the proportion of the population speaking Sadan/ Sadri increased from 5.6% in 1961 to 14.3% in 2001. There was also a decline in the proportion of the population speaking such languages as Nepali/ Gorkhali, Hindi, Kurukh/ Oraon, Santali, Munda and Rajbanshi.[9]

According to the West Bengal Official Language Act 1961 and the West Bengal Official Language (Amendment Act) 2012, the Bengali language is to be used for official purposes in the whole of West Bengal. In addition to Bengali, the Nepali language is to be used for official purposes in the three hills subdivisions, namely Darjeeling, Kalimpong and Kurseong, in the district of Darjeeling, and Urdu is to be used for official purposes in district/subdivision/ block/ municipality where the population speaking Urdu exceeds 10% of the total population. The English language will continue to be used for official purposes as it was being used prior to the enactment of these laws.[10][11][12][13]

The West Bengal Official Language (Second Amendment) Bill, 2012, included Hindi, Santhali, Odiya and Punjabi as official languages if it is spoken by a population exceeding 10 per cent of the whole in a particular block or sub-division or a district. Subsequently, Kamtapuri, Rajbanshi and Kurmali were also included in the list of minority languages by the West Bengal Official Language (Second Amendment) Bill, 2018.[14][15] However, as of 2020, there is no official / other reliable information about the areas covered. Census 2011 provides language data only at the district and above level.

Religion in Kumargarm CD block
Hindu
82.27%
Christian
11.97%
Muslim
4.34%
Buddhist
0.79%
Others
12.60%

In the 2011 Census of India, Hindus numbered 164,226 and formed 82.27% of the population of Kumargram CD block. Christians numbered 23,901 and formed 11.97% of the population. Muslims numbered 25,591 and formed 4.34% of the population. Buddhists numbered 1,584 and formed 0.79% of the population. Others numbered 25,143 and formed 12.60% of the population.[16] Others include Addi Bassi, Marang Boro, Santal, Saranath, Sari Dharma, Sarna, Alchchi, Bidin, Sant, Saevdharm, Seran, Saran, Sarin, Kheria,[17] and other religious communities.[16]

Poverty level

Based on a study of the per capita consumption in rural and urban areas, using central sample data of NSS 55th Round 1999-2000, Jalpaiguri district was found to have relatively high rates of poverty of 35.73% in rural areas and 61.53% in the urban areas. It was one of the few districts where urban poverty rate was higher than the rural poverty rate.[18]

According to a World Bank report, as of 2012, 26-31% of the population of Jalpaiguri, Bankura and Paschim Medinipur districts were below poverty line, a relatively high level of poverty in West Bengal, which had an average 20% of the population below poverty line.[19]

Economy

Livelihood

Livelihood
in Kumargrm CD block

  Cultivators (15.41%)
  Agricultural labourers (26.23%)
  Household industries (3.67%)
  Other Workers (54.70%)

In the Kumargram CD block in 2011, among the class of total workers, cultivators numbered 12,190 and formed 15.41%, agricultural labourers numbered 20,744 and formed 26.23%, household industry workers numbered 2,901 and formed 3.67% and other workers numbered 43,264 and formed 54.70%.[20] Total workers numbered 79,099 and formed 39.63% of the total population, and non-workers numbered 120,510 and formed 60.37% of the population.[21]

Note: In the census records a person is considered a cultivator, if the person is engaged in cultivation/ supervision of land owned by self/government/institution. When a person who works on another person's land for wages in cash or kind or share, is regarded as an agricultural labourer. Household industry is defined as an industry conducted by one or more members of the family within the household or village, and one that does not qualify for registration as a factory under the Factories Act. Other workers are persons engaged in some economic activity other than cultivators, agricultural labourers and household workers. It includes factory, mining, plantation, transport and office workers, those engaged in business and commerce, teachers, entertainment artistes and so on.[22]

Infrastructure

There are 53 inhabited villages in the Kumargram CD block, as per the District Census Handbook, Jalpaiguri, 2011. 100% villages have power supply. 51 villages (96.23%) have drinking water supply. 21 villages (39.62%) have post offices. 47 villages (88.68%) have telephones (including landlines, public call offices and mobile phones). 36 villages (67.92%) have pucca (paved) approach roads and 21 villages (58.49%) have transport communication (includes bus service, rail facility and navigable waterways). 5 villages (9.43%) have agricultural credit societies and 7 villages (13.21%) have banks.[23]

Agriculture

The economy of the Jalpaiguri district is mainly dependent on agriculture and plantations, and majority of the people are engaged in agriculture. Jalpaiguri is well-known for tea and timber. Other important crops are paddy, jute, tobacco, mustard seeds, sugarcane and wheat. The annual average rainfall is 3,440 mm, around double of that of Kolkata and the surrounding areas. The area is flood prone and the rivers often change course causing immense damage to crops and cultivated lands.[24]

In 2013-14, there were 64 fertiliser depots, 39 seed stores and 49 fair price shops in the Kumargram CD block.[25]

In 2013–14, the Kumargram CD block produced 21,175 tonnes of Aman paddy, the main winter crop, from 10,536 hectares, 868 tonnes of Boro paddy (spring crop) from 339 hectares, 4,806 tonnes of Aus paddy (summer crop) from 2,507 hectares, 3,466 tonnes of wheat from 1,272 hectares, 1,730 tonnes of maize from 222 hectares, 11,004 tonnes of jute from 823 hectares and 64,503 tonnes of potatoes from 2,483 hectares. It also produced pulses and oilseeds.[25]

In 2013-14, the total area irrigated in the Kumargarm CD block was 3,535 hectares, out of which 1,655 hectares were irrigated by canal water, 125 hectares by tank water, 625 hectares by river lift irrigation, 40 hectares by deep tube wells, 695 hectares by shallow tube wells, 395 hectares by open dug wells.[25]

Dooars-Terai tea gardens

Tea gardens in the Dooars and Terai regions produce 226 million kg or over a quarter of India's total tea crop.. The Dooars-Terai tea is characterized by a bright, smooth and full-bodied liquor that's a wee bit lighter than Assam tea. Cultivation of tea in the Dooars was primarily pioneered and promoted by the British but there was significant contribution of Indian entrepreneurs.[26][27]

Banking

In 2013-14, Kumargram CD block had offices of 6 commercial banks and 1 gramin bank.[25]

Backward Regions Grant Fund

The Jalpaiguri district is listed as a backward region and receives financial support from the Backward Regions Grant Fund. The fund, created by the Government of India, is designed to redress regional imbalances in development. As of 2012, 272 districts across the country were listed under this scheme. The list includes 11 districts of West Bengal.[28][29]

Transport

Kumargram CD block has 8 ferry services and 4 originating/ terminating bus routes.[25]

NH 31C passes through the block.

Only Railway Station - Kamakhyaguri Railway Station.

Education

In 2013-14, Kumargram CD block had 127 primary schools with 12,898 students, 14 middle schools with 1,906 students, 3 high school with 3,402 students and 12 higher secondary schools with 17,454 students. Kumargram CD block had 1 general degree college with 4,140, 3 technical/ professional institutions with 230 students, 607 institutions for special and non-formal education with 26,554 students.[25]

See also – Education in India

According to the 2011 census, in the Kumargram CD block, among the 53 inhabited villages, all villages had schools, 46 villages had two or more primary schools, 40 villages had at least 1 primary and 1 middle school and 15 villages had at least 1 middle and 1 secondary school.[30]

Saheed Kshudiram College was established at Kamakhyaguri in 1996. Affiliated with the University of North Bengal, it offers courses in arts and science.[31][32]

Sports

Kumargram popularly known for marathon oneday knockout football tournaments organised by different village clubs. There are many talented athletes need more attention, by which they can bring success for pride of this region. The major play ground are Kamakhyaguri High School Maidan, Kamakhyaguri mini indoor stadium.

Healthcare

In 2014, Kumargram CD block had 1 rural hospital, 2 primary health centres and 2 NGO/ private nursing homes with total 72 beds and 8 doctors (excluding private bodies). It had 35 family welfare subcentres. 5,414 patients were treated indoor and 81,846 patients were treated outdoor in the hospitals, health centres and subcentres of the CD block.[25]

Kamakhyaguri Rural Hospital, with 30 beds at Kamakhyaguri, is the major government medical facility in the Kumargram CD block. There are primary health centres at Kumargram (with 6 beds), Barabisa (PO Kumargram) (with 6 beds).[33][34]

References

  1. ^ "District Census Handbook, Jalpaiguri, Series 20, Part XIIA" (PDF). Census of India 2011, page 13 Physiography. Directorate of Census Operations, West Bengal. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "District Census Handbook, Jalpaiguri, Series 20, Part XIIA" (PDF). Census of India 2011, Fifth page, map of Jalpaiguri district. Directorate of Census Operations, West Bengal. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  3. ^ "Koochbihar CD blocks/ tehsils". Maps of India. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  4. ^ "Kokrajhar Revenue Circle/ Tehsil map". Maps of India. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  5. ^ "District Statistical Handbook 2014 Jalpaiguri". Tables 2.1, 2.2. Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Government of West Bengal. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  6. ^ "Directory of District, Subdivision, Panchayat Samiti/ Block and Gram Panchayats in West Bengal". Bankura - Revised in March 2008. Panchayats and Rural Development Department, Government of West Bengal. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e "CD block Wise Primary Census Abstract Data(PCA)". 2011 census: West Bengal – District-wise CD blocks. Registrar General and Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  8. ^ "Provisional Population Totals, West Bengal , Table 4". Census of India 2001, Jalpaiguri district (02). Census Commissioner of India. Archived from the original on 2011-07-19. Retrieved 2011-03-20.
  9. ^ "District Census Handbook Jalpaiguri, Series 20, Part XII A , 2011 census" (PDF). page 46: Mother tongue. Directorate of Census Operations West Bengal. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  10. ^ "West Bengal Official Language Act 1961". Latest Laws.com. Retrieved 10 May 2020.
  11. ^ "The West Bengal Official Language Act 1961". Advocate Tanmoy Law Library. Retrieved 10 May 2020.
  12. ^ "The West Bengal Official Language Act, 1961" (PDF). Retrieved 10 May 2020.
  13. ^ "Official status for Urdu in some West Bengal Areas". The Hindu, 2 April 2012. Retrieved 10 May 2020.
  14. ^ "Multilingual Bengal". The Telegraph, 11 December 2012. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  15. ^ "Kamtapuri, Rajbanshi make it to the list of official languages in Bengal". Outlook, 28 February 2015. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  16. ^ a b "C1 Population by Religious Community". West Bengal. Registrar General and Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  17. ^ "ST-14 A Details Of Religions Shown Under 'Other Religions And Persuasions' In Main Table". West Bengal. Registrar General and Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  18. ^ "West Bengal Human Development Report 2004" (PDF). Page 80: Table 4.5 Per capita consumption in rural and urban areas by district. Development and Planning Department, Government of West Bengal. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 May 2012. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  19. ^ "West Bengal: Poverty, Growth and Inequality" (PDF). World Bank Group. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  20. ^ "District Census Handbook Jalpaiguri, Census of India 2011, Series 20, Part XII A" (PDF). Table 33: Distribution of Workers by Sex in Four Categories of Economic Activity in Sub-district 2011. Directorate of Census Operations, West Bengal. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  21. ^ "District Census Handbook Jalpaiguri, Census of India 2011, Series 20, Part XII A" (PDF). Table 30: Number and percentage of Main workers, Marginal workers and Non workers by Sex, in Sub-districts, 2011. Directorate of Census Operations, West Bengal. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  22. ^ "District Census Handbook Jalpaiguri, Census of India 2011, Series 20, Part XII A" (PDF). Census Concepts and Definitions, Page 23. Directorate of Census Operations, West Bengal. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  23. ^ "District Census Handbook, Jalpaiguri, 2011, Series 20, Part XII A" (PDF). Page 81, Table 36: Distribution of villages according to availability of different amenities, 2011. Directorate of Census Operations, West Bengal. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  24. ^ "District Census Handbook, Jalpaiguri, 2011, Series 20, Part XII A" (PDF). Pages 15, 18, 19. Directorate of Census Operations, West Bengal. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g "District Statistical Handbook 2014 Jalpaiguri". Table No. 16.1, 18.1, 18.2, 20.1, 21.2, 4.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3 – arranged as per use. Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Government of West Bengal. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  26. ^ "Tea Growing Regions". Dooars and Terai. Indian Tea Association. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  27. ^ "Dooars-Terai". Tea Board India. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  28. ^ "Backward Regions Grant Funds: Programme Guidelines" (PDF). Ministry of Panchayati Raj, Government of India. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 October 2017. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  29. ^ "Backward Regions Grant Fund". Press Release, 14 June 2012. Press Information Bureau, Government of India. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  30. ^ "District Census Handbook, Jalpaiguri, 2011, Series 20, Part XII A" (PDF). Page 412, Appendix I A: Villages by number of Primary Schools and Appendix I B: Villages by Primary, Middle and Secondary Schools. Directorate of Census Operations, West Bengal. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  31. ^ "Saheed Kshudiram College". SKC. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  32. ^ "Saheed Kshudiram College". College Admission. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  33. ^ "Health & Family Welfare Department" (PDF). Health Statistics – Rural Hospitals. Government of West Bengal. Retrieved 1 July 2020.
  34. ^ "Health & Family Welfare Department" (PDF). Health Statistics – Primary Health Centres. Government of West Bengal. Retrieved 1 July 2020.
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