Greenlee County, Arizona

Greenlee County
Benjamin F. Billingsley House in Duncan, Arizona
Official seal of Greenlee County
Map of Arizona highlighting Greenlee County
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Map of the United States highlighting Arizona
Arizona's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 33°06′06″N 109°16′07″W / 33.1017°N 109.2686°W / 33.1017; -109.2686
Country United States
State Arizona
FoundedMarch 10, 1909
Named forMason Greenlee
SeatClifton
Largest townClifton
Area
 • Total1,848 sq mi (4,790 km2)
 • Land1,843 sq mi (4,770 km2)
 • Water5.3 sq mi (14 km2)  0.3%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total9,563
 • Estimate 
(2021)
9,404 Decrease
 • Density5.2/sq mi (2.0/km2)
Time zoneUTC−7 (Mountain)
Congressional district6th
Websitewww.co.greenlee.az.us
1901 Clifton railroad station, now used by the Chamber of Commerce and other community organizations.
Azurite specimen from the great Morenci Mine.

Greenlee County is a county in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2020 census, the population was 9,563,[1] making it Arizona's least populous county. The county seat is Clifton.

The economy of Greenlee County is dominated by the Morenci Mine, the largest copper mining operation in North America, and one of the largest copper mines in the world. As of 2017, the mine complex, owned by Freeport-McMoRan, had about 3,300 employees.[citation needed]

History

Greenlee County was created in 1909 and named for Mason Greenlee who was an early settler in the Clifton area. It was Arizona's 14th county and formed from part of Graham County, which opposed the formation because Graham County would lose considerable revenue. Clifton has always been the county seat.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,848 square miles (4,790 km2), of which 1,843 square miles (4,770 km2) is land and 5.3 square miles (14 km2) (0.3%) is water.[2] It is the second-smallest county by area in Arizona.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
192015,362
19309,886−35.6%
19408,698−12.0%
195012,80547.2%
196011,509−10.1%
197010,330−10.2%
198011,40610.4%
19908,008−29.8%
20008,5476.7%
20108,437−1.3%
20209,56313.3%
2021 (est.)9,404[3]−1.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[4]
1790–1960[5] 1900–1990[6]
1990–2000[7] 2010–2020[1]

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 8,547 people, 3,117 households, and 2,266 families living in the county. The population density was 5 people per square mile (2/km2). There were 3,744 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 74.2% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 1.7% Native American, 0.2% Asian, <0.1% Pacific Islander, 20.0% from other races, and 3.5% from two or more races. 43.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 25.2% reported speaking Spanish at home.[8]

There were 3,117 households, out of which 39.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.3% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.3% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 31.7% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 109.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 108.0 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,384, and the median income for a family was $43,523. Males had a median income of $38,952 versus $23,333 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,814. About 8.0% of families and 9.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.1% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 8,437 people, 3,188 households, and 2,152 families living in the county.[9] The population density was 4.6 inhabitants per square mile (1.8/km2). There were 4,372 housing units at an average density of 2.4 per square mile (0.93/km2).[10] The racial makeup of the county was 77.2% white, 2.3% American Indian, 1.1% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 15.0% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 47.9% of the population.[9] In terms of ancestry, 12.9% were English, 12.1% were German, 10.6% were Irish, and 1.6% were American.[11]

Of the 3,188 households, 37.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.5% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.5% were non-families, and 27.8% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.21. The median age was 34.8 years.[9]

The median income for a household in the county was $48,696 and the median income for a family was $51,729. Males had a median income of $50,446 versus $34,171 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,281. About 9.4% of families and 13.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.8% of those under age 18 and 13.2% of those age 65 or over.[12]

Politics

Greenlee County used to be the most reliably Democratic county in Arizona, owing to the presence of the copper mining industry. It voted for the Democratic presidential candidate in every election from the state's admission to the Union in 1912, to 1996, being one of only seven Mountain State counties to support George McGovern in his landslide defeat against Republican Richard Nixon in the 1972 Presidential Election.[a] Even Ronald Reagan was unable to win it in his 49 state landslide in 1984. However, in 2000, George W. Bush became the first Republican presidential candidate to win the county, and it has voted for the Republican nominee in the 5 elections since, giving Donald Trump 66% of the vote in 2020. The county's turn to the GOP can likely be explained by the Democratic Party's anti-mining platform, as Greenlee's economy is heavily dependent on copper mining, with Bush's 2000 opponent, Vice President Al Gore being staunchly against coal mining.[13][14]

United States presidential election results for Greenlee County, Arizona[15][16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 2,433 65.83% 1,182 31.98% 81 2.19%
2016 1,892 57.33% 1,092 33.09% 316 9.58%
2012 1,592 53.32% 1,310 43.87% 84 2.81%
2008 1,712 58.63% 1,165 39.90% 43 1.47%
2004 1,899 61.92% 1,146 37.37% 22 0.72%
2000 1,619 54.70% 1,216 41.08% 125 4.22%
1996 1,159 34.16% 1,755 51.72% 479 14.12%
1992 1,451 36.34% 1,695 42.45% 847 21.21%
1988 1,526 46.21% 1,733 52.48% 43 1.30%
1984 1,801 47.58% 1,963 51.86% 21 0.55%
1980 1,537 40.64% 2,043 54.02% 202 5.34%
1976 1,532 36.07% 2,601 61.24% 114 2.68%
1972 1,758 45.57% 2,013 52.18% 87 2.26%
1968 1,026 27.35% 2,434 64.89% 291 7.76%
1964 1,132 26.45% 3,147 73.55% 0 0.00%
1960 1,313 29.94% 3,069 69.97% 4 0.09%
1956 1,784 39.69% 2,711 60.31% 0 0.00%
1952 1,377 31.32% 3,019 68.68% 0 0.00%
1948 680 22.97% 2,069 69.88% 212 7.16%
1944 739 27.33% 1,956 72.34% 9 0.33%
1940 619 22.08% 2,175 77.60% 9 0.32%
1936 218 12.31% 1,526 86.17% 27 1.52%
1932 377 19.29% 1,558 79.73% 19 0.97%
1928 685 42.08% 935 57.43% 8 0.49%
1924 404 29.97% 768 56.97% 176 13.06%
1920 905 44.45% 1,131 55.55% 0 0.00%
1916 672 28.79% 1,492 63.92% 170 7.28%
1912 109 9.28% 652 55.54% 413 35.18%

The county is located in Arizona's 6th congressional district, which has a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+3 and is represented by Republican Congressman Juan Ciscomani.[17] In the Arizona House of Representatives it is represented by Republican Becky Nutt and Republican Drew John.[18] In the Arizona Senate it is represented by Republican Gail Griffin.[19]

Communities

Map of incorporated and unincorporated areas in Greenlee County

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Other locations

  • Strayhorse, a location along Route 191 in the vicinity of Strayhorse creek/canyon/campground[20]

Ghost Towns

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Greenlee County.[21][22]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Population (2010 Census) Municipal type Incorporated
1 Clifton 3,311 Town
2 Morenci 1,489 CDP
3 Duncan 696 Town 1938
4 York 557 CDP
5 Franklin 92 CDP

Education

School districts include:[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 27, 2022.
  2. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  3. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved September 27, 2022.
  4. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  5. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  6. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  7. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  8. ^ "Language Map Data Center". apps.mla.org. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  9. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  10. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  11. ^ "DP02 Selected Social Characteristics in the United States – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  12. ^ "DP03 Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  13. ^ "Biden controlled by Liberal progressives and environmentalists". Aheadoftheherd.com. May 27, 2021. Retrieved March 20, 2022.
  14. ^ "Gore Group, Industry Butt Heads Over 'Clean Coal'". NPR. December 4, 2008. Retrieved March 20, 2022.
  15. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of United States Presidential Elections". Retrieved June 11, 2011.
  16. ^ Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920–1964; pp. 487–489 ISBN 0405077114
  17. ^ Ryan Best, Aaron Bycoffe and Nathaniel Rakich (January 20, 2022). "What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State – Arizona | FiveThirtyEight". Projects.fivethirtyeight.com. Retrieved March 20, 2022.
  18. ^ "Member Roster at Arizona Legislature". Archived from the original on May 3, 2009. Retrieved May 5, 2009.
  19. ^ "Member Roster for Arizona Senate". Archived from the original on May 13, 2009. Retrieved May 5, 2009.
  20. ^ "26 Nov 1947, p. 17 – Arizona Republic at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  21. ^ "2010 U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 10, 2013.
  22. ^ "2010 Census Block Maps - Geography - U.S. Census Bureau". Archived from the original on December 29, 2014. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  23. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Greenlee County, AZ" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved July 17, 2022. - Text list

Notes

  1. ^ The others were Deer Lodge and Silver Bow in Montana, Costilla and Pitkin in Colorado, plus San Miguel and Rio Arriba in New Mexico

External links

  • County website

Coordinates: 33°06′06″N 109°16′07″W / 33.10167°N 109.26861°W / 33.10167; -109.26861

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